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Clinic wants to create a public square on Euclid

Marc Lefkowitz  |  07/27/06 @ 9:58am

The Cleveland Clinic wants to divert car traffic off of Euclid Avenue and create a public square between E. 86th and E. 105th streets.

“Removing cars would create a pedestrian-friendly ‘campus center’ along Euclid, as the nonprofit behemoth seeks to green up and soften its institutional look,” The Plain Dealer’s Tom Breckenridge reports today.

A city official familiar with the proposal says, “It reminds me of the 16th Street Mall in Denver,” the 16-block long pedestrian and transitway mall that serves as the retail core of downtown Denver.

It's great that the Clinic is thinking about a more welcoming presence in the city after decades of building fortress architecture (Cleveland State University offers a good model). But the timing of this proposal has created panic at RTA because it threatens to delay construction of the long-planned Euclid Corridor bus rapid transit project — a delay that could jeopardize tens of millions of dollars in federal transit funding. 

Other issues and questions:  

  • City of Cleveland officials are concerned about funneling more traffic on to E. 86th Street, where new housing is being developed.
  • How would removal of cars from that stretch of Euclid affect local businesses and churches? (Euclid Corridor planners have already spent years resolving access issues.)
  • What would happen to the Euclid Corridor bike lane, which is planned to be the essential bike link between downtown and University Circle?

What are your thoughts?

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