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Blog

7.18.08

GCBL staff  |  07/18/08 @ 4:55pm

  • Bill Moyers Journal investigates the mortgage foreclosure crunch and the impact on Cleveland tonight at 10 p.m. on WVIZ-PBS Channel 25. In 2007 and 2008 the City of Cleveland will have spent $12 million demolishing foreclosed and abandoned homes, the Journal reports. And the number of homeless students in Cleveland's public schools has increased by 40% over the last year. Read more.
  • Want to learn about the latest developments in solar energy and the solar tax credits in Congress? NPR's Science Friday radio show today (7/18) at 2pm will feature a 'solar energy roundup' discussion.
  • Locavores swear you can taste the difference with local food and that it's more nutritious. Farmer's markets are in full bloom right now. Saturday markets include The Coit Road Farmers Market at Huron Road Hospital (featuring blueberries, peaches, corn, tomatoes, zucchini and yellow squash, sweet onions, new potatoes and farm fresh eggs); the North Union Farmers Markets at six locations including Shaker Square and Parma; The Countryside Farmers' Market at Heritage Farms in Peninsula; The Tremont Farmer's Market and more. For a complete list, go here.
  • Do you want to learn more about how to reduce the carbon footprint of your meals? A local foods potluck on Thursday, July 31at Crown Point Ecology Center in Bath will share dishes and ideas about promoting a healthy and sustainable local food economy. Read more.
  • How important is public transit to Cleveland? Joe Calabrese, CEO and General Manager, answers that question, and talks about the infrastructure of the city, in this video podcast (20 MB) from the Greater Cleveland Partnership.

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