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Practical steps to reduce carbon, The Fund for Sustainability and more

Marc Lefkowitz  |  09/04/09 @ 1:42pm

Burning River Fest was one of the highlights of the summer. If you missed the party, we have a great photo gallery of the day, and a photo pledge booth (click on the picture) from the GCBL table where we asked people what they will do to reduce their carbon footprint. See what your neighbors are doing.

  • Pledges are important, but some are less effective in reducing carbon than we may think. A study from the UK's Carbon Focus tallies the least effective and provides "Practical and Achievable Actions to Save 4 Tonnes".
  • The Fund for Our Economic Future launched The Fund for Sustainability with seed money from the Cleveland Sustainability Summit and a pledge to raise more for start-up sustainability businesses in Northeast Ohio. The Fund also set up a $2.2 mil fund for advanced energy.
  • The City of Cleveland passed an idle reduction/fuel conservation ordinance. Twenty five cities in Northeast Ohio also support the ordinance.
  • Ohio Department of Development's Ohio Energy Office is accepting applications for $14 million in funding available through the Deploying Renewable Energy: Wind and Solar grant program. This announcement marks the first set of renewable energy grants to be funded through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) in Ohio.
  • Walk Score developed a cool, free iPhone app to check the walkability of your location and map nearby amenities with walking directions.

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