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Everybody's for equity, but who wants to walk the talk?

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/10/17 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Biking, Transit, Walking, Driving, Transportation

Over the last decade, complete streets have been firmly established with urban planners, biking, transit and health advocates as a central tenet to improved access and safety on roads largely built for the convenience of cars.

<br /><br />With its MemFix plan, the City of Memphis has given its blessing to groups of volunteers helping pilot complete streets. <br /><br />Road diet with buffered bike lane proposed for Noble Road in Cleveland Heights.<br /><br />
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Big #transit gathering in #CLE raises prospects

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/06/17 @ 2:00pm  |  Posted in Transit

More than 100 people showed up on a Wednesday evening in Cleveland to participate in a discussion about the future of transit in Northeast Ohio.

<br />Transit supporter fill the room at Cleveland Market Garden to discuss the future of transit with TransitCenter Jon Orcutt and Clevelanders for Public Transit advocacy group.

The long distance affair for transit

Marc Lefkowitz  |  03/10/17 @ 12:00pm  |  Posted in Transit, Vibrant cities

A healthy debate is swirling around Northeast Ohio's “spatial mismatch” between people seeking work and the employment centers where jobs are moving. The debate centers on the role of transit to connect households in Cleveland’s urban core—up to 40% of which are car free—to jobs that are increasingly moving out to the periphery of the metropolitan area.

Rail runs through it<br />Solon, Ohio has gained manufacturers like Stouffers. Transit is limited from Cleveland. A freight line (seen here) was studied for its commuter rail feasibility in 2002.Little there<br />A low density suburban development in Northeast Ohio typifies the challenge of increasing transit.

When Cleveland invests in transit-oriented development, it succeeds

Marc Lefkowitz  |  02/13/17 @ 9:00am  |  Posted in Transit, Vibrant cities

Cities that are jumping on transit are glad they did. Transit attracts "environmentally conscious, outgoing people, largely in their 30s and 40s, who are open to taking transit but find the service inconvenient or inadequate," a 2014 national poll found. "Policymakers and transit providers could most easily increase transit ridership by focusing on this group."

Smart line<br />Cleveland State University and RTA invested in major upgrades to its #55 bus to serve a young population interested in transit resulting in a 43 percent increase to ridership.Down and out<br />Sprawl without growth has left Greater Cleveland with a legacy of vacant units, mounting transportation costs, government debt, and tens of thousands of excess properties. Perversely, these development trends hurt municipal revenues and cripple local capacity to regulate land use development and transportation investments. Nevertheless, the Ohio Department of Development and NOACA project these trends to continue through 2030.

In Akron, transit & recycling could give a lift to households in poverty

Marc Lefkowitz  |  10/28/16 @ 1:00pm  |  Posted in Home efficiency, Transit

A new report finds that jobs in "waste mining” and investments in public transit systems would be as effective as traditional workforce development and job creation strategies in Akron, Detroit, and eight other cities that might include the green economy in poverty reduction goals.

<br />Improving transit in Akron-Summit County could gain the region $8 million, and give a lift to households in poverty.

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