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Trees gain ally: Science and Technology

Marc Lefkowitz  |  11/02/17 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Vibrant cities, Transform, Plants & animals

“Urban Forests” author Jill Jonnes offered Cleveland an invaluable lesson on how the city earned, and then lost, its moniker ‘the Forest City.’ Speaking at Levin College of Urban Affairs yesterday, Jonnes harkened back to John Davey, the 19th century arborist from Kent, Ohio whose book “The Tree Doctor” inspired today’s 8,000-employee Kent-headquartered tree service company, Davey Tree. In a chapter in...

<br />Science and tech have shown how much street trees add to property value and perform valuable ecological services like cleaning the air and reducing flooding.

University Circle expands transit link to Little Italy and Coventry

Marc Lefkowitz  |  10/10/17 @ 3:00pm  |  Posted in Vibrant cities, Transportation choices

For the past year and a half, I have been working with other sustainable transportation advocates in their respective University Circle workplaces to convene a Sustainable Transportation Advisory Committee (STAC). Our mission is to “Improve community health, reduce carbon emissions, and mitigate traffic congestion by increasing the use of sustainable, multi-modal transportation options and establishing a ‘park once’ district.” With...

<br />The CirclLink / BlueLink line picks up passengers on Coventry Road<br /><br /><br /><br />New mixed use, residential / commercial density in University Circle

The long distance affair for transit

Marc Lefkowitz  |  03/10/17 @ 12:00pm  |  Posted in Transit, Vibrant cities

A healthy debate is swirling around Northeast Ohio's “spatial mismatch” between people seeking work and the employment centers where jobs are moving. The debate centers on the role of transit to connect households in Cleveland’s urban core—up to 40% of which are car free—to jobs that are increasingly moving out to the periphery of the metropolitan area.

Rail runs through it<br />Solon, Ohio has gained manufacturers like Stouffers. Transit is limited from Cleveland. A freight line (seen here) was studied for its commuter rail feasibility in 2002.Little there<br />A low density suburban development in Northeast Ohio typifies the challenge of increasing transit.

When Cleveland invests in transit-oriented development, it succeeds

Marc Lefkowitz  |  02/13/17 @ 9:00am  |  Posted in Transit, Vibrant cities

Cities that are jumping on transit are glad they did. Transit attracts "environmentally conscious, outgoing people, largely in their 30s and 40s, who are open to taking transit but find the service inconvenient or inadequate," a 2014 national poll found. "Policymakers and transit providers could most easily increase transit ridership by focusing on this group."

Smart line<br />Cleveland State University and RTA invested in major upgrades to its #55 bus to serve a young population interested in transit resulting in a 43 percent increase to ridership.Down and out<br />Sprawl without growth has left Greater Cleveland with a legacy of vacant units, mounting transportation costs, government debt, and tens of thousands of excess properties. Perversely, these development trends hurt municipal revenues and cripple local capacity to regulate land use development and transportation investments. Nevertheless, the Ohio Department of Development and NOACA project these trends to continue through 2030.

Get to work: Two Cleveland corporate relocations illustrate employment access inequities

Marc Lefkowitz  |  01/12/17 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Vibrant cities, Transportation choices

Being able to practically get to a job is a measure of the usefulness and economic attractiveness of a city, concludes University of Minnesota in its annual ranking of how well U.S. cities provide access to jobs via transit. Transit access is a metric that matters—the report says—because 5% of all Americans use transit to commute to work, making it the...

Eaton before<br />Transit access from Eaton Corporation’s former headquarters at E. 12th Street and Superior in downtown Cleveland. Source: Mapnificent.comEaton after<br />Transit access from Eaton Corporation new headquarters in Beachwood / Chagrin/ I-271 corridor.

Color on the maps show a 30-minute transit trip at 8 a.m with a maximum of 10 minute walk on either end. The map tool works from data provided by RTA in the Google Transit format.American Greetings, before the move<br />Transit access from American Greetings old headquarters in Brooklyn (an inner-ring suburb of Cleveland).American Greetings after the move<br />Transit access from American Greetings new headquarters in Westlake/Crocker Park.

Color on the maps show a 30-minute transit trip at 8 a.m with a maximum of 10 minute walk on either end. The map tool works from data provided by RTA in the Google Transit format.

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Ten water saving tips

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We're at the shore of Lake Erie, but we still have good reasons to conserve

10 best ecological restoration

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Explore local food resources and a map of farmers markets in Northeast Ohio