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Friday, February 11, 2011
7:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Corporate Roundtable: Advanced and Renewable Energy in Ohio; The Future According to Ohio Utilities

Advanced and renewable energy are big topics globally and locally here in Ohio...witness the leadership in Northern Ohio to build an offshore wind industry in Ohio ; advanced polymers using biofuels and biomass in Akron; the burgeoning solar industry capacity in Toledo; the advanced fuel cells and battery industry in Northern Ohio.

Project developers, manufacturers, venture capital, local and regional communities, and the public are excited to take advantage of new opportunities for clean energy and the potential economic development that can come with it. Energy efficiency is also part of that equation for a sustainable clean tech future.

But what are the views of Ohio utilities? After all, the power produced will be carried over their lines or will be purchased by them for their own customers. How much is real and how do these strategies fit into their long term strategic plans and integrated resource planning ? What do they support?

Please join us for a unique panel discussion with key utility stakeholders moderated by Mike Zimmer, Executive in Residence at the Voinovich School of Public Leadership, Center for Energy, Environment and Economy, at Ohio University, and energy lawyer in the Washington DC office of Thompson Hine LLP.

Panelists:

  • Randell J. Corbin, Assistant Vice President, American Municipal Power
  • Gary Leidich, Executive Vice President and President, First Energy Generation
  • Mark R. Shanahan, Executive Director, Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, and formerly Governor Strickland's Energy Advisor
For more information about the Corporate Roundtable and membership, please contact Marie Herlevi at 216 523 7278 or m.herlevi@csuohio.edu 

    Advanced and renewable energy are big topics globally and locally here in Ohio...witness the leadership in Northern Ohio to build an offshore wind industry in Ohio ; advanced polymers using biofuels and biomass in Akron; the burgeoning solar industry capacity in Toledo; the advanced fuel cells and battery industry in Northern Ohio. Project developers, manufacturers, venture capital, local and regional communities, and the public are excited to take advantage of new opportunities for clean energy and the potential economic development that can come with it. Energy efficiency is also part of that equation for a sustainable clean tech future. But what are the views of Ohio utilities? After all, the power produced will be carried over their lines or will be purchased by them for their own customers. How much is real and how do these strategies fit into their long term strategic plans and integrated resource planning ? What do they support? Please join us for a unique panel discussion with key utility stakeholders moderated by Mike Zimmer, Executive in Residence at the Voinovich School of Public Leadership, Center for Energy, Environment and Economy, at Ohio University, and energy lawyer in the Washington DC office of Thompson Hine LLP. Panelists:
    • Randell J. Corbin, Assistant Vice President, American Municipal Power
    • Gary Leidich, Executive Vice President and President, First Energy Generation
    • Mark R. Shanahan, Executive Director, Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, and formerly Governor Strickland's Energy Advisor
    For more information about the Corporate Roundtable and membership, please contact Marie Herlevi at 216 523 7278 or m.herlevi@csuohio.edu 

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