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Saturday, April 28, 2012
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Tree planting to reforest stream corridor

Volunteers needed.

Supporters of the Cuyahoga River have started Cuyahoga ReLeaf®, which aims to restore forest cover to areas throughout the watershed in order to shade streams, reduce erosion, capture and store surface runoff and increase habitat for aquatic wildlife. Forest cover is the most extensive, efficient, and least expensive tool we have to manage stormwater, stabilize soils, provide habitat, clean the air and reduce nutrient runoff into streams. We know that streams protected and nurtured in wooded areas are the highest quality streams in the watershed. But we've lost, and are still losing, vast tracts of tree canopy to development and pests. Emerald Ash Borer is killing host trees by the hundreds, so we're helping nature out by planting young trees that will grow to replace lost ash trees, and shrubs and grasses to re-vegetate streamsides.

Over the past few months, with funding from OhioEPA and the Ohio Environmental Education Fund (OEEF,) we've held mapping workshops for communities to identify target locations for restoration. Now, with help from Friends of Big Creek, the City of Brooklyn, ODNR's regional urban forester and Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding from the U.S. Forest Service, we'll be planting healthy new riparian buffers, starting with a stretch of Stickney Creek, a tributary to Big Creek.

WE HOPE YOU CAN JOIN US on Saturday, April 28, from 9am til 1pm, at Brooklyn's Memorial Park, behind City Hall on Memphis just west of Ridge Rd. We invite volunteers of all ages to come help out. We need diggers, mulch spreaders, team organizers, tree-waterers, and folks to help with registration and refreshments. CALL 216-241-2414 x610 and leave a callback number or email us at releaf@crcpo.org if you'd like to volunteer, bring a group or donate (gloves, water, donuts or dough would be greatly appreciated.)

Volunteers needed. Supporters of the Cuyahoga River have started Cuyahoga ReLeaf®, which aims to restore forest cover to areas throughout the watershed in order to shade streams, reduce erosion, capture and store surface runoff and increase habitat for aquatic wildlife. Forest cover is the most extensive, efficient, and least expensive tool we have to manage stormwater, stabilize soils, provide habitat, clean the air and reduce nutrient runoff into streams. We know that streams protected and nurtured in wooded areas are the highest quality streams in the watershed. But we've lost, and are still losing, vast tracts of tree canopy to development and pests. Emerald Ash Borer is killing host trees by the hundreds, so we're helping nature out by planting young trees that will grow to replace lost ash trees, and shrubs and grasses to re-vegetate streamsides. Over the past few months, with funding from OhioEPA and the Ohio Environmental Education Fund (OEEF,) we've held mapping workshops for communities to identify target locations for restoration. Now, with help from Friends of Big Creek, the City of Brooklyn, ODNR's regional urban forester and Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding from the U.S. Forest Service, we'll be planting healthy new riparian buffers, starting with a stretch of Stickney Creek, a tributary to Big Creek. WE HOPE YOU CAN JOIN US on Saturday, April 28, from 9am til 1pm, at Brooklyn's Memorial Park, behind City Hall on Memphis just west of Ridge Rd. We invite volunteers of all ages to come help out. We need diggers, mulch spreaders, team organizers, tree-waterers, and folks to help with registration and refreshments. CALL 216-241-2414 x610 and leave a callback number or email us at releaf@crcpo.org if you'd like to volunteer, bring a group or donate (gloves, water, donuts or dough would be greatly appreciated.)

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