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This is what leadership looks like

Marc Lefkowitz  |  11/22/19 @ 10:00am  |  Posted in Reduce, Green buildings, Clean water, Connecting to nature

The search for the greenest places leads to the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Pittsburgh. The reputation of Phipps was solidified when it built its Center for Sustainable Landscapes in 2012. It is one of only a handful of buildings nationwide to be recognized as a Living Building, the most stringent green building rating system in the world. The...

Sky's the limit<br />Phipps Center for Sustainable Landscapes in Pittsburgh is one of the greenest public buildings in the world. Photo credit: Denmarsh Photography, Inc.

Another look at Where the River Burned

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/09/19 @ 4:00pm  |  Posted in Clean water

The 2015 book Where the River Burned: Carl Stokes and the Struggle to Save Cleveland looms large in 2019, the 50th anniversary of the last fire on the Cuyahoga River.

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My gravel driveway: A follow up story

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/05/19 @ 2:00pm  |  Posted in Clean water, Home landscaping

Ten years ago, we succeeded in convincing the city to let us replace a broken asphalt driveway—broken because it was growing over the tree root of a 75 to 100 foot tall white oak tree—with a new, well-constructed gravel driveway.

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Great Lakes Cycle paintings astound, deepen concern

Marc Lefkowitz  |  11/30/18 @ 1:00pm  |  Posted in Clean water, Connecting to nature

The Great Lakes Cycle, a suite of giant paintings now on view at MOCA Cleveland, acts as a guide and a warning about what spawns from a lack of awareness — of what it means to be a model citizen living within the world’s largest freshwater ecosystem. If we’re not careful, it will devolve into a Jacques Cousteau nightmare. By drinking...

Pioneers<br />Alexis Rockman, 2017, oil and acrylic on wood panel. 72 x 144 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Sperone Westwater, New York.

Erie shaped over time, by friends and foes

Marc Lefkowitz  |  11/08/18 @ 4:15pm  |  Posted in Clean water, Water

Because it is shallow and warm, Erie is the most biologically diverse of the Great Lakes. 15,000 years ago, the lake formed as retreating mile-high glaciers scoured the land. Only 24 feet from the hard limestone in the western basin, but shale in the east basin is more pliable and went down 210 feet. Arguably, Lake Erie’s next geological event of...

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