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Five practical and one big thing for clean water

Marc Lefkowitz  |  01/25/13 @ 3:00pm  |  Posted in Clean water

We've barely cracked 2013, but already regionalism has notched a victory as Northeast Ohio's stormwater utility went live in January.

Wipe out<br />Erosion in the South Chagrin

How dirty is your river? Check this GPS enabled map

Marc Lefkowitz  |  01/21/13 @ 2:00pm  |  Posted in Clean water

What’s in your local creek or stream? Using the EPA “My Watershed” water quality report (with GPS), you can easily discover all you need to know about the water quality in your area. Like, is there bacteria or worse fouling up the water, killing fish and getting people sick?

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A new course for clean water

Marc Lefkowitz  |  01/18/13 @ 9:00am  |  Posted in Clean water

We clicked open an email this morning announcing the SC2019 Water Group’s merger with the Alliance for Water Future. The Water Sustainability Council, a volunteer group from Cleveland’s 10-year sustainability effort, is joining forces with a new organization that wants to set up a big tent for all clean water efforts.

Know your water<br />Alliance for Water Future wants to nurture a clean water culture in Cleveland. Photo: GCBL.

Extreme theatre: Water Ways

David Beach  |  01/13/13 @ 4:00pm  |  Posted in Clean water

Great Lakes residents who wish that water would become a more significant part of our culture should check out the premier of Water Ways at Cleveland Public Theatre (CPT), January 24 – February 4.

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We're writing a clean water agenda

Marc Lefkowitz  |  01/11/13 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Clean water

GreenCityBlueLake is making it real simple. As a venue for ideas on what is real sustainability and how we can achieve it, we streamlined our beautiful new web site with its Explore-Live-Transform template. Transform is where we amplify and collectively work on the big questions. It’s where we ask you and other stakeholders to share their vision for ‘what is...

Mouth of the Cuyahoga River before the Clean Water Act<br />Modern environmental regulations have greatly reduced industrial pollution, but we are still a long way from healthy and sustainable water resources. Edgewater Beach, Cleveland Lakefront State Park<br />Swimming at Lake Erie beaches without fear of bacterial pollution from sewer overflows should be a basic goal. Student naturalists<br />Every kid should be able to wade in streams and discover all the life -- fish, insects, mussels -- in a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Fishing at Gordon Park<br />A good indicator of the sustainability of our water resources is whether Lake Erie fish are safe to eat without restriction. Rocky River<br />The Cleveland Metroparks projects much of the Rocky River stream corridor, but stormwater runoff and development outside the park damage the river.Grand River tributary<br />One on the best ways to guard water quality is to protect fragile headwater streams, such as this creek flowing through the Grand River Terraces Preserve of The Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Creating a culture of water<br />Events like the Burning River Fest at the Old Coast Guard Station help to raise awareness of the importance of water.
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