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Fascinating before-and-after photos of treelawns in CLE reveal the awesome nature of cities

Marc Lefkowitz  |  04/11/14 @ 1:00pm  |  Posted in Home landscaping, Connecting to nature, Plants & animals

During a recent trip to Tijuana, Mexico landscape designer, Armando Ramos, who is fighting for the creation of a central park within the borders of his city of 1.7 million inhabitants, made a connection between nature and math. The World Health Organization has calculated that we all need to breath 360 liters of oxygen a day, he said, adding that it...

Honeylocusts on Morton<br />This tree canopy on Morton in Cleveland grew in a mere 40 years.Lindens on South Woodland<br />Images from the same spot in 1970 on the left and 2007 on the right show the impact trees can have on our feeling of a place. 

From Street Tree Evaluation Project: Forty Years of Street Tree Evaluation in Five Communities.Faasens Black Norway Maple on Arlis<br />The tree canopy on Arlis in Cleveland has the visual effect of making the road seem narrower.Japanese Scholartrees on W. 33rd Street<br />None of the original trees from the 1950s survived. Many were aggressively pruned below the power lines.Callery pears on Birchwold<br />The variation between losing a brick-lined street for asphalt is interesting. The pear trees didn't survive particularly well.Corktrees on College<br />College Street in Wooster shows how mature canopy trees dramatically change our perception of place.Norway maples on W. 58th Street<br />Many Cleveland streets suffered the loss of tree lawn trees over the last 40 yearsHawthornes on Heinritz<br />Heinritz in Cleveland lost many of its street trees since 1970.Lake in Toledo<br />Ash trees on W. 182nd Street<br />Miracle on W.182nd Street in Cleveland. The survival of Velvet Ash trees.
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A plan emerges to connect Cleveland and suburbs with greenways and bike trails

Marc Lefkowitz  |  10/31/13 @ 4:00pm  |  Posted in Biking, Connecting to nature

Does your city make you sick? Cuyahoga County and Cleveland expect to find out where are the greatest health disparities within the region. Their $100,000 Health Impacts Assessment (HIA) is looking at a range of social and environmental conditions—from crime to roads—since they are stronger indicators of health than genetics, says Martha Halko at the county Board of Health.

Shaker Lakes <br />An urban park between Cleveland and Shaker Heights has some trailsLake to Lakes Trail<br />Linking University Circle and ShakerOpportunity knocks<br />Belvoir Road in South Euclid and University Heights could be ideal for a greenway and bike trailThe eastside connection<br />City of Euclid is looking to link Euclid Creek Metropark with the lakefrontRails to trails<br />Cleveland converted an old rail line to a bike trail in Slavic Village

An opportunity to green the corridor?

Marc Lefkowitz  |  10/21/13 @ 11:00am  |  Posted in Connecting to nature

Back in 2008, the state of Ohio woke up to its fiscal constraints and examined the myths handed down from the past, such as, road construction: Does it create permanent jobs, quality places and a certain magic that made traffic jams disappear? When the answer was 'no', projects like Opportunity Corridor literally went away.

Green opportunity corridors<br />A map of green systems and vacant land in Cleveland. Image: Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative from 2008 ReImagine projectGreen crown<br />A vision for a green restoration of Kingsbury Run. Image: Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. Vacant to green<br />A vision for vacant land as a green corridor in Slavic Village. Image from Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

Lakefront hopes

David Beach  |  06/10/13 @ 4:00pm  |  Posted in Connecting to nature

A great lakefront—clean, beautiful, green, and publicly accessible—has been at the top of Cleveland's civic to-do list for decades. Now it's starting to happen.

Edgewater Park in Cleveland<br />

Clean Ohio shows big returns from land preservation and brownfield redevelopment

David Beach  |  05/01/13 @ 4:00pm  |  Posted in Vibrant cities, Connecting to nature

The Clean Ohio Fund – the state’s primary funding source for open space conservation, farmland preservation, brownfield revitalization, and trail creation – has been a popular program. Now two independent studies have documented how the program generates big returns for the state’s economy.

Future segment of the Towpath Trail<br />A grant from the Clean Ohio Fund is helping to protect and restore this key section of riverfront along the Cuyahoga River on the Scranton Road Peninsula in Cleveland. It's one of many critical greenspaces purchased with Clean Ohio funds in Cuyahoga County.

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